Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th International Conference on Bioprocess and Bio Therapeutics Houston, Texas, USA.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Zhinan Xia

Moderna Biotherapeutics,USA

Keynote: Rapid Discovery of Therapeutic Antibody with Improved Drug ability and Develop ability

Time : 10:00-10:35

OMICS International Bioprocess 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Zhinan Xia photo
Biography:

Dr. Zhinan Xia is a recognized leader in antibody technologies and therapeutics. He earned his Ph.D. degree in protein engineering from the College of Pharmacy at the University of Kentucky. He also completed an M.S. degree in drug design from the China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, China, and a B.S. degree in medicinal chemistry from Nanjing College of Pharmacy, Nanjing, China.

 

Abstract:

Rapidly discover and optimize therapeutic mAb is the key factor to success in a very competitive fast changing global pharmaceutical market place. We have developed a very rapid approach that allows you to discover novel therapeutic m Ab lead molecule in a few months. Here is what you need: a good humanized transgenic mice, phage/yeast display and NGS capability. This talk will demonstrate how we obtain a mAb drug development candidate in less than 4 months from mice immunization, phage display/NGS to pm affinity lead molecule identification

Break:
Coffee break 10:35-10:50@Foyer

Keynote Forum

Yung shyeng Tsao

Merck Research Laboratory, Kenilworth, USA

Keynote: Cell culture kinetics and automation

Time : 10:50-11:25

OMICS International Bioprocess 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yung shyeng Tsao photo
Biography:

Yung shyeng Tsao received his PhD from the University of Tennessee, specialized in Liposome and Membrane Technologies. He was a Post-doctoral Fellow in New York University, specialized in Membrane Trafficking and Protein Secretion Mechanisms. He joined Schering-Plough Research Institute/Merck in 1988 and developed cell lines for gene therapy and recombinant protein production. He has published in the area of protein isolation and characterization, membrane biophysics and fusion mechanisms, liposome drug targeting, membrane trafficking, protein secretion and degradation mechanisms, animal cell culture media, serum-free virus production, aggregated cell monitoring, cell growth-protein productivity-metabolic modeling, cell culture miniaturization and automation, and transcriptome and integrative pathway analysis.

Abstract:

Mammalian cell culture automation relies on timely detection of cultural parameters, such as cell densities, metabolic concentrations as well as waste build-up, and a reliable algorithm for timely intervention to sustain cellular well-being and desired productivity. The conventional approach for calculating cell growth and metabolic rates is mostly time-based. However, if cell densities, metabolite concentrations and product titer are plotted against IVCC (Integral of Viable Cell Count) then the slopes would show their specific rates. The IVCC conversion can not only provide direct visual cues for the investigators but is also more accurate than the time-based analysis for specific rate computation since it is not affected by the fluctuations in cell viability during the cell culture batch. In this presentation, we will show how parameters such as glucose, lactate, glutamine and glutamate can be used to determine cell densities, viability and cell growth rate without counting cells, once the correlation for the cell line is established. We will also show that the IVCC approach can demonstrate distinct phase changes for cell growth, death and product formation which correspond to different metabolic phase changes for 12 individual CHO clones expressing the same therapeutic antibody investigated. In addition, the efficiency of cell making is shown to determine the maximal cell density and the duration of cell culture of the fed-batches. In conclusion, IVCC approach can be a key for cell culture automation which requires simplicity, sensitivity, accuracy and predictability.

Keynote Forum

Aydin Berenjian

The University of Waikato, Waikato, New Zealand

Keynote: Vitamin K fermentation: challenges and prospectives

Time : 11:25-12:00

OMICS International Bioprocess 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Aydin Berenjian  photo
Biography:

Dr. Aydin Berenjian is a lecturer at the University of Waikato (New Zealand). Aydin has BE, ME and PhD in biochemical engineering. After graduation from the university of Sydney (Australia), Aydin began his career as a postdoctoral research fellow and later on, in 2014 he became a lead researcher in the field of bioprocess engineering at the University of Waikato. Aydin’s main research interests are: Fermentation technology including upstream and downstream processing; Biofilm technology; Kinetics, modelling and optimization of bioprocesses; drug biosynthesis and Functional foods. He serves as the editor of Molecular Biotechnology (Springer Science, Germany) and Associate Editor of American Journal of Biochemistry and Biotechnology (Science Publication, USA). Aydin has published more than 50 peer-reviewed articles, and renowned 2 international patents. He has also won several prestigious awards including IChemE  and WCECS Research Awards. 

Abstract:

The Vitamin K series, particularly menaquinone, have been attracting research attention, due to the potential in reducing both osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases. To date I have investigated the various biotechnological approaches for the production of menaquinone, including types of fermentations, extraction and recovery to significantly reduce the production price. Breakthroughs in up-streaming and down-streaming the production process for menaquinone will be discussed. Recommendations will be given for areas of future research in order to improve the production process for menaquinone and reduce costs.

 

  • workshop
Location: windsor-I

Session Introduction

Yung shyeng Tsao

Merck Research Laboratory, Kenilworth, USA

Title: Mathematical tranformation to faciliate the proper calculation and presentation of specific rates in cell culture

Time : 12:00-13:00

Speaker
Biography:

Yung shyeng Tsao received his PhD from the University of Tennessee, specialized in Liposome and Membrane Technologies. He was a Post-doctoral Fellow in New York University, specialized in Membrane Trafficking and Protein Secretion Mechanisms. He joined Schering-Plough Research Institute/Merck in 1988 and developed cell lines for gene therapy and recombinant protein production. He has published in the area of protein isolation and characterization, membrane biophysics and fusion mechanisms, liposome drug targeting, membrane trafficking, protein secretion and degradation mechanisms, animal cell culture media, serum-free virus production, aggregated cell monitoring, cell growth-protein productivity-metabolic modeling, cell culture miniaturization and automation, and transcriptome and integrative pathway analysis.

Abstract:

Mammalian cell culture automation relies on timely detection of cultural parameters, such as cell densities, metabolic concentrations as well as waste build-up, and a reliable algorithm for timely intervention to sustain cellular well-being and desired productivity. The conventional approach for calculating cell growth and metabolic rates is mostly time-based. However, if cell densities, metabolite concentrations and product titer are plotted against IVCC (Integral of Viable Cell Count) then the slopes would show their specific rates. The IVCC conversion can not only provide direct visual cues for the investigators but is also more accurate than the time-based analysis for specific rate computation since it is not affected by the fluctuations in cell viability during the cell culture batch. In this presentation, we will show how parameters such as glucose, lactate, glutamine and glutamate can be used to determine cell densities, viability and cell growth rate without counting cells, once the correlation for the cell line is established. We will also show that the IVCC approach can demonstrate distinct phase changes for cell growth, death and product formation which correspond to different metabolic phase changes for 12 individual CHO clones expressing the same therapeutic antibody investigated. In addition, the efficiency of cell making is shown to determine the maximal cell density and the duration of cell culture of the fed-batches. In conclusion, IVCC approach can be a key for cell culture automation which requires simplicity, sensitivity, accuracy and predictability.

Break:
Lunch Break 13:00-14:00@Churchill
  • Fermentation Technology
Location: windsor-I
Speaker

Chair

Aydin Berenjian

University of Waikato, New Zealand

Session Introduction

Yutaka Nakashimada

Hiroshima University, Japan

Title: Fermentation technology to recover energy and high-value added products from seaweed

Time : 14:00-14:25

Speaker
Biography:

Yutaka Nakashimada received Doctorate degree in Chemical Engineering from Nagoya University in 1995. Since 2014, he has been Professor at Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Hiroshima University. His current research interests are in effective control of anaerobic digestion of solid organic matters including land and marine biomass and syngas fermentation for biogas conversion to more useful materials using a thermophilic acetogen.

 

Abstract:

Seaweed has attracted the attention as a promising candidate of a renewable feedstock. In the presentation, we will demonstrate several technologies for biorefinery of brown algae with marine microbial resources. Methane fermentation has been widely used to treat organic matters such as food wastes and livestock wastes with production of fuel gas. However, methane fermentation is inhibited by high salt concentration. This restricted biogas production from undiluted brown algae since it contained high salt content of ca. 2-3% in wet basis. We will present that the marine sediments were successfully used for halophilic methane fermentation to treat raw brown algae. To improve the economics of energy production from marine biomass, it is feasible to produce high-value added functional lipids such as polyunsaturated fatty acids, xanthophylls, and hydrocarbons by using marine protists, thraustochytrids, as biocatalyst. Although, thraustochytrids Aurantiochytrium strain do not have ability to directly utilize such algal saccharides for their growth, we found a microorganism can degrade and convert algal saccharides into suitable substrates for Aurantiochytrium strain. By cultivating in media composed of culture supernatant of some algal saccharide-assimilating bacteria, the Aurantiochytrium strain was able to propagate and accumulate the target lipids. Marine macroalgae are metal absorbers. We found that photosynthetic bacteria can remove toxic heavy metals and recover rare earth. Copper, cobalt and cadmium that were detected in the Laminaria lysate at minute amount level, were successfully removed from lysate. Moreover, some strains succeeded to recover yttrium and tellurium with high purity by easy method.

Speaker
Biography:

Osagie A Osadolor has been a PhD student at University of Boras, Sweden since 2014. His PhD thesis is on “Textile Bioreactor Development for Ethanol and Biogas Production”. Prior to this, he worked as a Management Trainee at Honeywell Groups, Nigeria and as a Graduate Assistant at University of Benin, Nigeria. He has a Master’s degree (MEng with distinction) and a Bachelor’s degree (BEng with first class honors) in Chemical Engineering from University of Benin, Nigeria. He has published 2 papers in reputable journals.

Abstract:

There is growing concern on bioethanol application as a transportation fuel because of the current low price of crude oil. To reduce the ethanol fermentation cost, how ethanol bioreactors can be designed to offer process flexibility, reduced investment cost, optimal productivity and more than 1 h-1 dilution rates without washout was investigated. A bioreactor made with textile as its backbone material of construction was designed to anaerobically utilize flocculating yeast for ethanol production without using mixing devices like aerators, spargers and stirrers. A mixing system was developed that used the flocculating yeast in the form of a fluidized bed in the bioreactor, and the conditions needed to maintain the fluidized bed in the bioreactor were determined. Recirculation flow rate and utilization of the mixing system were used as process variables for fermentation experiments. It was found that it is possible to use the fluidized mixing system in the bioreactor at dilution rate of 1.2 h‑1 without washout. Mass transfer limitations associated with mixing when using flocculating yeast was resolved even at low recirculation mixing rate of 0.0016 VVM. Specific ethanol productivity of 0.29±0.01 g-ethanol/g-biomass/h with complete sucrose consumption was attained. Using the bioreactor with flocculating yeast can reduce the fermentation investment cost of a 100,000 m3/y ethanol plant by 37%.

  • Fuel Development technology|Bioprocess Seperation Techniques
Location: Windsor-I
Speaker

Chair

Sakae Tsuda

National Institute of Advanced Science and Technology, Japan

Session Introduction

Yuhong Zhou

University College London, UK

Title: An integrated approach for whole bioprocess design

Time : 14:50-15:15

Speaker
Biography:

Yuhong Zhou obtained a PhD in Control Engineering from Imperial College and has established expertise in Biochemical Engineering and Bioprocess Design research over more than 20 years. Her research goals include developing methods for faster creation of bio- manufacturing processes at lower cost. Her research interests are bioprocess modeling, development of bioprocess knowledge bases, metabolic network modeling, bioprocess monitoring and control, and rapid whole bioprocess design achieved by combining ultra-scale down experimentation and bioprocess modeling.

Abstract:

A biotherapeutic product requires many bioprocess steps to produce, recover and purify. We have identified interactions among these steps. The optimization of the operation parameters are often determined sequentially from upstream to downstream and individually after the selection of appropriate unit operation steps. Such a linear approach often needs many reworking when difficulties appear in any of the downstream steps due to the interactions among the steps. An integrated approach for whole bioprocess design would recognize such interactions and enable new experimental design methods to take these interactions into consideration. Such an integrated approach has the potential to increase the efficiency of the whole process and reduce the time and the cost of the process development phase. In this presentation, several process interactions in a typical whole bioprocess will be identified and an integrated whole bioprocess design approach and its new challenges will be introduced. As the complexity in the design of a whole bioprocess increases, the need for taking a holistic approach is manifested. These new challenges will be presented through a series of case studies which demonstrate that, by taking the advantage of high throughput experimentation and ultra-scale down technology, new experimental design methods and data visualization methods, the process design can be optimized. Our results showed that the experimentation effort needed for bioprocess development can be significantly reduced. In addition, the integrated approach helps us to understand the bioprocess characteristics better and enable the creation of novel solutions. Future perspectives on an integrated approach for the faster creation of bio-manufacturing processes at lower cost will also be highlighted.

Debabrata Das

Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India

Title: Improvement of gaseous energy recovery from organic wastes using biohythane process

Time : 15:15-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

Debabrata Das has completed his PhD from Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi and Post-doctoral studies from University of Utah. He was MNRE Chair Professor and presently associated as Professor-in-Charge in PK Sinha Center for Bioenergy, IIT Kharagpur. He has published 2 books; more than 128 papers in reputed journals; 22 chapters in books and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of Int. Journal of Hydrogen Energy, Biotechnology for Biofuels, Indian Journal of Biotechnology and Editor-in-Chief of American Journal of Biomass and Bioenergy. He received IAHE Akira Mitsue and BRSI Malaviya Memmorial Awards for his contribution in bio-hydrogen research.

Abstract:

The rapid consumption of the fossil fuel resources causes an accelerated release of the bound carbon as CO2, which causes greenhouse effect. The need of the hour is an efficient fuel with zero carbon footprints and this path can be achieved by producing hydrogen. Biological route of H2 production has pitched itself as a renewable technology which not only serves the purpose of energy generation but also help in waste management. Dark fermentative H2 production has shown production highest rate amongst the all the biological routes (photo-fermentation and Microbial electrolysis cells). Dark fermentative H2 production has been carried out using acidogens present in the anaerobic digestion process. To make the process more economical and sustainable, the effluent generated from dark fermentation could be utilized by methanogens for methane generation. Such two stage integrated system for hythane production permits an increase in conversion efficiency of organic wastes to gaseous energy. Suitability of distillery effluent for hydrogen production was investigated using acidogenic mixed consortia developed from anaerobic sludge. Phylogenetic analysis of the developed consortia showed the dominance of Clostridium spp. in the consortia. Enriched consortia resulted in 63% increase in hydrogen production (142.8 mmol H2/L) with hydrogen yield of 10.15 mol H2/Kg COD reduced and 40% COD reduction. Further, to improve the overall gaseous energy recovery, spent media of hydrogen production was used for methane production in second reactor using methanogenic consortia developed from anaerobic sludge. Methane production of 29.5 mmol CH4/L was observed using spent media from mixed consortia.

Break:
Coffee Break 16:00-16:20